Integrating -omics and physiology in studies of hypoxia adaptation: Insights from Mount Everest to Machu Picchu

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://ucsd.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAvf-ytrj4uGdbL0e4jvL-C1Im-QzhKetkh 

 

Friday, January 22, 2021 -
2:00pm to 3:00pm
Zoom
Tatum Simonson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, & Sleep Medicine

Department of Medicine

University of California San Diego School of Medicine

 

Integrating -omics and physiology in studies of hypoxia adaptation: Insights from Mount Everest to Machu Picchu

Abstract: 

Recent -omics advancements have accelerated our ability to discover how the genome contributes to shared and distinct variations in human traits, including those that have been essential for survival.  Some of the most striking examples of adaptation within our species have occurred in highlanders, with notable physiological variation noted within and between Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian populations.  Through integrative and comparative analyses, we prioritize key genomic signatures and associated physiological links important for understanding individual responses to hypoxemia.  These investigations help identify potential targets for personalized medicine approaches that may be beneficial across diverse and previously understudied populations.  

 
Bio: 

Tatum Simonson is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Physiology at UC San Diego School of Medicine and a National Geographic Explorer.  Her research team applies integrative physiological genomics approaches to understand how natural variation aids or impedes hypoxia challenges inherent to high altitude and common disease states (e.g., sleep apnea, cardiopulmonary disease, altitude illnesses).  These and related interdisciplinary efforts are coordinated through the Center for Physiological Genomics of Low Oxygen Dr. Simonson founded and co-directs at UC San Diego.  Dr. Simonson also teaches courses related to genetics and physiology in the Department of Anthropology and the School of Medicine.